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One Drew Remains
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby One Drew Remains » Fri Nov 03, 2017 2:28 pm

Yep. That's the one.
Altered:
9/17/11, 5/02/14, 10/16/14, 10/08/16, 1/28/17, 5/13/17, 12/08/17

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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Fri Nov 03, 2017 3:18 pm

Classic Rock 243 - 3 Nov 2017

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Alter Bridge (whith the Parallax Orchestra)

Al­ter Bridge bring a whole new mean­ing to ‘clas­sic rock’ with an epic RAH show.

For all its classical history, formal splendour and Cirque du Soleil performances, the Royal Albert Hall has been enticing rock artists for decades. The Rolling Stones played here in 1966. In ’67 Jimi Hendrix rolled up with Pink Floyd and The Move. In 1970 Led Zeppelin made an appearance. Things came to a halt when the hall banned all rock and pop concerts in 1972 (after a particularly disruptive ’71), but rock was swiftly reinstated and the doors opened to the likes of The Who, Robert Plant, Chris Cornell… Now it’s the turn of four guys from Florida, here for two heavily hyped, resoundingly sold-out shows.

Three of them play in other bands as well, and they’re all among the least ego­tis­ti­cal peo­ple you’ll meet in the in­dus­try, but Al­ter Bridge have be­come one of this gen­er­a­tion’s big­gest hard rock bands. They com­fort­ably sell out are­nas. Their last three al­bums hit the UK Top 10. They have armies of de­voted fans who’ve fol­lowed them around the globe for the last 13 years, right up to th­ese per­for­mances at the RAH – their most am­bi­tious gigs yet, teamed with a 52-piece sym­phony orches­tra and mega-scale pro­duc­tion.

And it all sprang from the ashes of Creed, the band formed in col­lege by a Detroit-born, Ital­ian-Amer­i­can fi­nance stu­dent called Mark Tre­monti, with drum­mer Scott Phillips and bassist Brian Mar­shall. When Creed called it a day in 2004, the three of them formed Al­ter Bridge, bring­ing in for­mer gui­tar teacher Myles Kennedy (who, through years play­ing in jazz fu­sion and rock bands, had dis­cov­ered he could also sing rather well).

“It feels like we were just kids back in the Creed days,” Tre­monti says to­day. “We were only in col­lege, I was about 19, we got a record deal when I was 23 or 24. When you’re younger you feel like 23 or 24 is ma­ture, but you’re still a baby. Creed feels like my col­lege band. And even the first cou­ple of records with Al­ter Bridge, we were ba­si­cally kids when we did them.”

On­stage, Tre­monti looks quite ‘hard’, with his dark, se­ri­ous eyes, big arms and black mo­hawk. Gui­tar strapped to his torso, he falls some­where be­tween a pro­tec­tive older brother and a mid­dleweight boxer. Back­stage, how­ever, he’s quite dif­fer­ent. Af­ter hours of metic­u­lous sound­check­ing and fan meet-and­greet­ing, we’re met at his dress­ing room with a breezy, to­tally gen­uine, “Hi! How’s it go­ing? Sorry this room smells like a chem­i­cal ex­per­i­ment or some­thing…” Seated in a black hoodie and smil­ing warmly, the 43-year-old fa­ther of two be­comes a much softer pres­ence.

It has to be said there are no ac­tual ‘chem­i­cal ex­per­i­ments’ (hal­lu­cino­genic or oth­er­wise) go­ing on here – just a fridge full of wa­ter bot­tles, a small black sofa and a big mir­ror with light bulbs round the rim. Sta­ples, per­haps, of a venue more ac­cus­tomed to clas­si­cal vir­tu­osos than rock stars. Across the cor­ri­dor there’s a door marked ‘Tun­ing Room’ and an­other marked ‘Vo­cal Warm-Up Room’, while round the cor­ner are school-style locker rooms with dress­ing ta­bles, where the young mem­bers of the Par­al­lax Orches­tra tend to in­stru­ments, sort out hair and chat over snacks.

The band seem calm, but clearly a lit­tle awed by their new sur­round­ings. Dur­ing sound­check, Kennedy es­pe­cially ap­pears sweetly star-struck, gaz­ing open-mouthed up at the huge au­di­to­rium, his skinny frame draped in a black cardie over a loose white T-shirt and black drain­pipe jeans. “It was just tak­ing in the struc­ture,” he ex­plains later. “I have a cer­tain ap­pre­ci­a­tion for ar­chi­tec­ture and what build­ings do to you on a psy­cho­log­i­cal level, and that build­ing was just do­ing tremen­dous things for me on a spir­i­tual level!”

Curious to think that in a few hours this almost fragile-looking man will showcase an immense voice that had him poised to
join Led Zeppelin at one point. Before that, however, Kennedy was a young trumpet-player from Spokane, Washington, who found the disciplined worlds of jazz, orchestral playing and guitar teaching long before he became one of rock’s most in-demand vocalists. It makes today’s proceedings almost familiar.

“I remember when I first walked in the room and heard the orchestra warming up, it kinda took me back,” he says. “It brought a certain amount of solace to me in a strange way. Because I spent so much time as a kid in a band environment, with an orchestra or symphonic band, it was very calming.”

Not that this has detracted from the anticipation of the whole occasion. “We’ve played Wembley, we’ve played The O2, we did Rock In Rio, but this is another level,” Tremonti says. “Our families didn’t fly to Rio to see us play, or The O2. This is the show all our families have flown across the ocean to see. They’ve never done that before. It makes us more nervous, but now we’ve sound-checked, it feels good. I’m ready.”

For such a big event it’s all come together remarkably quickly, even if the idea was conceived around November 2016, when Alter Bridge manager Tim Tournier approached Parallax Orchestra conductor/ arranger Simon Dobson. Tournier had been impressed by Parallax’s Albert Hall show with metal megastars Bring Me The Horizon, and wondered if they could collaborate. Dobson, a “huge rock fan”, jumped at the challenge, so Parallax Orchestra manager/violinist Will Harvey began assembling the best players possible – hand-picked for their blend of technical virtuosity and love of rock and metal. Dobson has spent the last three months writing the orchestral parts, and he, the orchestra and the band have two days together to set up, adjust and rehearse.

Soundchecking earlier, Parallax Orchestra are a visibly young team – average age “about 24, 25”, mostly recent music college graduates – in jeans, Converse and T-shirts. The second they start playing, even without the band, their age becomes irrelevant – they sound brilliant. When the band do join in, it’s an enormous sound.

Dobson doesn’t fit the stereotypical image of a conductor: young and skinny in black jeans, leather jacket, spacers in his ears and a part-shorn head, enthusing about rock and metal. “We pride ourselves on being an alternative orchestra,” he says pre-show. “There are players in our orchestra who play Mahler and Beethoven and Mozart, but also we specifically hunt out those players who are into rock and metal bands. So to get that kind of aggression and attitude from the orchestra is not hard, because they’re into it anyway.”

“We’ve played pretty much every song… once,” Tremonti says, with a slightly nervous smile, “maybe twice some of them, so we really haven’t rehearsed very much. We had scheduled two days and we thought we’d come in and blow through the set a few times each day, but the first day took tons of setting up and getting everything right. And you can’t just fly by the seat of your pants with an orchestra – a lot of the songs we’ve done over the years we’ve strayed from the album version, without really realising it.”

“Alter Bridge’s music is so utterly raging that there are certain things I just know are going to work,” Dobson enthuses. “For example, if they’re chugging along on some gnarly half-time riff we just join them and it makes everything sound twice as big. Whereas if they’re doing something more like a ballad we can make everything wider. So our job really is to amplify what the songs already are.

“I suppose I’ve added a little bit because I’m a composer and I can’t help but do that, but our job is really to make whatever they do… just bigger.”

And ‘bigger’ they make it. The Albert Hall is stuffed from the floor to the nosebleed gallery seats with Alter Bridge fans of all ages. We see parents with children, bouncy 20-somethings and everything in between. Many are in T-shirts from previous tours. Those who forked out for the VIP Gold Package were treated to a private soundcheck performance, plus photos and hugs with the band. One fan has her wheelchair decorated with the artwork for latest album The Last Hero. The band are friendly and engaged, Kennedy quieter than the others to save his voice for those huge notes later on.

“I’ve always been a little neurotic about it,” he admits, “because I kind of live to deliver, and when I can’t, it’s… it’s a challenge for me. When you’re on a stage and people have paid to see a show, they have high expectations of you.”

Tonight’s songs have been picked for their suitability for orchestration, including more layered tracks that seldom feature on their regular set-lists these days. “That’s why tonight’s gonna be… a little stressful for us,” Tremonti smiles nervously backstage, “because a lot of these songs we hardly ever play.”

Things kick off with Slip To The Void. Its atmospheric opening and pensive structure come layered with haunting strings and strains of brass, woodwind and kettle drums. It’s a captivating scene-setter. Not that there aren’t any no-nonsense powerhouses, mind you. Second number Addicted To Pain offers more guitar-chugging fun, before the band hit new cinematic levels with Before Tomorrow Comes, the orchestra adapting seamlessly to fit and magnify.

For Dobson, it’s a dream gig. A trumpeter and arranger who graduated from the Royal College Of Music, he’s played in a range of brass and wind groups, and funk, rock and punk bands. “I always knew my music theory, I was always having music lessons when everyone else was at parties,” he tells us. “But then I was always into rock bands. So the two parts of me were able to meet in Parallax Orchestra.”

After a 25-minute intermission, the likes of The End Is Here acquire a mystical, Kashmir-ish quality. Kennedy has an acoustic spotlit moment with Wonderful Life and Watch Over You – a reminder that his is the voice to beat in modern rock. But it’s the powerful Words Darker Than Their Wings, long missed from their set, that’s so heartily cheered it all feels quite emotional. It’s magnificent, embellished to epic effect by the orchestra, the band pouring every ounce they have into its rousing tones.

As the set progresses and the band relax into it, their excited, disbelieving grins and glances round the cavernous space whisper that they’re nailing it – and they know they’re nailing it. “This has been unbelievable,” Kennedy says, before they close with a superb Blackbird and Open Your Eyes.

After the show, having thrown picks and drumsticks into the whooping crowd, the band disappear to spend time with their families.

“My mum and dad came – it was the first time they’ve ever been over to this part of the world,” says Kennedy, buzzing post-show. “I mean, even my guitar instructor from when I grew up showed up for the show! I think we all collectively feel a sense of relief that it seemed to go smoothly, and though we had a limited amount of time with the orchestra to rehearse, it turned out to be enough fortunately. So we were really thrilled when it was all said and done. I don’t think it’s something we’ll ever forget.”

Going forward, having been such a resounding success here, the Parallax Orchestra hope to do many more collaborations like this. “We want to work with big-ass rock bands, and we want to show people that orchestras are not just some po-faced elitist thing,” says Dobson earnestly. “Some people think they are, but we want to change things.”

As for Alter Bridge, “We would be thrilled to get to do this again,” enthuses Kennedy. “I think all four of us felt like those shows were probably the most memorable experiences of our career. We had no idea it was gonna go that well.”

Alter Bridge won’t go down in history as hellraisers. For fans, their relatability, the sense that Kennedy and co. are ‘their guys’ is profoundly appealing. What’s more, sometimes ordinary men can be extraordinary – and when they are, as we saw tonight, it’s tremendous to behold.
Last edited by Torsten on Thu Nov 09, 2017 8:34 pm, edited 9 times in total.

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anguyen92
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby anguyen92 » Fri Nov 03, 2017 5:04 pm

Arggggh.

The images are not clearing up the text. Can't read what it is saying.

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Way better than zaz

Postby gbruin » Sat Nov 04, 2017 5:21 am

Torsten, you're the best! :rockon
Another photobucket casualty... :(
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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Mon Nov 06, 2017 10:03 pm

Guitar World - Holiday 2017

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Sorry for the delayed. :( More updates coming soon! :hug

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Tigra » Tue Nov 07, 2017 4:01 am

Big thanks to you for that!

I love this interview... It gives a lot of insight into what's happening behind the scenes. And the crew day sheet is somewhat depressing, isn't it? It seems as if the guys barely knew what day it was... They're in the center of a storm while on tour, just packing, unpacking, rehearsing, checking-in, checking-out, doing meets'n'greets... Without that sheet they wouldn't know in what country they currently are :lol

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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:21 am

Metal Hammer UK 303 – December 2017

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby gbruin » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:32 am

Torsten, you're the best! TT should hire you on as an official PR guy. Thanks!!! :rockon
Another photobucket casualty... :(
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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:24 pm

anguyen92 wrote:Arggggh.

The images are not clearing up the text. Can't read what it is saying.


This story was updated to more accurately reflect.

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Ubik » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:45 pm

Awesome stuff, Torsten.

Myles must've had a lot to chat about with Simon Dobson, trumpeters with jazz influences!
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Merinda » Fri Nov 10, 2017 11:49 pm

Of course the one time I make it into a crowd photo in a magazine I'm not even looking at Myles.
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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:39 pm

Metal Hammer Spain – December 2017

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby gbruin » Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:47 pm

¡Gracias, Torsten!

(sí, yo puedo leerlo)
Another photobucket casualty... :(
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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:05 am

RockZone 142 – December 2017

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Last edited by Torsten on Sun Jan 07, 2018 6:37 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby abw1987 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:26 pm

Thanks for sharing all these! Love reading the ones about RAH.
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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:09 pm

Kerrang! – December 16, 2017

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:15 pm

The Spokesman-Review (Spokane) – December 15, 2017

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Spokane’s Myles Kennedy returns home with Alter Bridge to share “The Last Hero”

The last time Orlando hard-rock quartet Alter Bridge performed in Spokane, a 2014 show at the Knitting Factory, lead singer/guitarist Myles Kennedy knew about three-quarters of the audience.

Kennedy, who moved to Spokane as a child, said the show was like a class, family and summer camp reunion all in one.

“Some of the people I hadn’t seen in years, decades,” he said. “It was like getting in a time machine.”

Hometown shows make performances both more comfortable and more nerve wracking for Kennedy, who said though it’s nice to see familiar faces, it adds pressure to put on the best show he can.

Kennedy might be feeling the pressure when Alter Bridge returns to the Knitting Factory for the final show behind the band’s fifth album, “The Last Hero,” but seeing as the Saturday show is sold out, the local support for the former Mayfield Four singer and Alter Bridge is evident.

Like he strives to always put on the best show he can, Kennedy and the rest of Alter Bridge – bassist Brian Marshall, drummer Scott Phillips and guitarist Mark Tremonti – aim to top themselves each time they put out an album

When entering the studio to record “The Last Hero,” the quartet relied on the level of trust it has developed over the band’s 13-year history to be even more spontaneous than before.

“We’ll get in a room together and have very basic ideas and skeletons of ideas that we’ll put in front of each other and through the teamwork, it will elevate it to a new level that I think separately we wouldn’t have been able to obtain,” Kennedy said.

The band also felt free to explore new lyrical paths, inspired by the 2016 presidential election.

Kennedy said the band has never been one to pick sides in a political situation, and while the band remains neutral on “The Last Hero,” he couldn’t help but incorporate things he was hearing into his lyrics.

“There was a certain disillusionment that a lot of people were feeling, and (we were) really trying to ultimately document that throughout the record,” he said.

“I remember dreaming not so long ago/The change was gonna come, I still had hope/How long must I keep waiting, feeling so ignored/Is anything worth saving anymore?” Kennedy sings on the title track.

With so much lyrical inspiration, Kennedy had little trouble writing lyrics for the album’s 13 songs. As a result, he found himself with a lot of time on his hands while in the studio.

To make the most of that time, Kennedy decided that instead of improvising his guitar solos (something he learned from Spokane guitar teacher Joe Brasch), he would plan them out.

“At first I wasn’t sure if that was the right move but once I spent a couple evenings doing it, I was like ‘This is going to be cool,’ ” he said. “It’s more composing the solos as opposed to letting it happen.”

After the band wraps up the tour, Kennedy will hardly have time to rest, as he’ll soon jump back on the road in support of his debut solo album “Year of the Tiger,” which is scheduled for release March 9.

“Year of the Tiger” is actually the second solo album Kennedy has recorded, but the first he’s been completely satisfied with.

The first record, which Kennedy intended to be more organic than the music he’s written in the past, was too reminiscent of the “sonic assault” often associated with the bands he’s a part of.

“I had to be real honest with myself,” Kennedy said. “It was hard because so much time and money had been put into that first record, but the irritating little artist guy in me was like ‘You know what, man? You’re not going to be content if you do this, so guess what? You get to start over again.’ ”

So last December, in between shows with Alter Bridge, Kennedy scrapped seven years of work and began writing what would become “Year of the Tiger.”

He used the vocals on a demo from the first solo album, but other than that, “Year of the Tiger” is completely new.

The albums aren’t even similar sonically.

Where the first solo album had more of a modern rock vibe and was more produced, “Year of the Tiger” features acoustic guitar, lap steel guitar, mandolin and banjo.

“Through that instrumentation, it reset the canvas,” Kennedy said.

Kennedy and producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette, who has produced all but the first Alter Bridge albums, also made the decision to record “Year of the Tiger” straight to tape, which limited the amount of tracks they had to work with.

On that now-blank canvas, Kennedy found room to create a concept album of sorts about his childhood, specifically the death of his father when Kennedy was 4 years old.

It was a subject he wanted to tackle for years, but every time he sat down to write, he said, it felt like he was running into a brick wall.

“I don’t know if it was too painful, I just could never bring myself to go there,” he said. “With this record, I really just told myself ‘Look, it’s time. You need to dig deep here, dig deep in the dirt, really find out what’s hiding in your memory, talk to your mom.’ ”

Kennedy’s mother helped him fill in the details of certain aspects of the family’s life after the loss of his father, and though he calls the songwriting process the most arduous he’s experienced, he said it was also cathartic.

“It was such a tough thing to have to go back and think about something that was such a tough situation for a family to go through,” he said. “But we made it. And my mom is the hero in that sense. The record documents that, how much I appreciate and respect what she did for my brother and I, and I’m very happy with how it all turned out.”

Kennedy has yet to announce tour dates in support of “Year of the Tiger,” but another hometown show wouldn’t be a surprise, as Spokane is where the Mead High School graduate took his first musical steps.

“There is not a day that goes by where I don’t realize that after doing this for a few decades that I still get to do this,” he said. “It’s a wonderful thing so I don’t take it for granted …

“I’m real excited to come home and I was absolutely thrilled to hear that the show sold out. It means a lot to me. Thank you, Spokane.”

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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Thu Jan 04, 2018 4:42 pm

Classic Rock UK - 2 January 2018

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Myles Kennedy unveils his solo debut

The singer with both Alter Bridge and Slash’s solo band finally releases his debut album in the spring via Napalm Records. Produced by Michael ‘Elvis’ Baskette, Year Of The Tiger is a 12-song concept album inspired by Kennedy losing his father when he was a child. It includes the tracks Ghost Of Shangri La, Love Can Only Heal and Devil On The Wall.

Last summer Alter Bridge guitarist Mark Tremonti joked that Kennedy’s album was “about eight years overdue”. Asked about the music on it, he said: “From what I’ve heard it’s less of an Alter Bridge-sounding rock’n’roll record and more in the vein of [his heroes] Chris Whitley and Jeff Buckley.”

Look out for a live recording from Alter Bridge’s two nights at the Albert Hall with the Parallax Orchestra too.

Kerrang! – January 06, 2018

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Metal Hammer Germany – February 2018

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Torsten
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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Torsten » Sat Jan 27, 2018 3:40 am

Myles Kennedy review new album is coming very soon.

Gitarre & Bass – Februar 2018

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Kerrang! – January 27, 2018

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Re: Magazine - Interview

Postby Timotheus » Sat Jan 27, 2018 7:15 am

Thanks, Torsten. Looking forward to it!
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