Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

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gbruin
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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby gbruin » Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:39 am

Torsten, the amount of work and tenacity you put into this thread is incredible. Thank you so much! For the record, I read almost all the English articles and most of the Spanish ones. I get a bit out of the French and Italian and Portuguese ones. Polish...I just look at the pictures lol. Where's Tigra when I need her?
Another photobucket casualty... :(
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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby MidnightToker » Fri Nov 02, 2018 12:05 pm

Ditto, thanks Torsten. I read all the English ones.

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Torsten
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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Mon Nov 05, 2018 11:07 am

Batterie Magazine [France] (December/January, 2019)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:13 am

HEAVY Magazine [Australia] (November, 2018)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:11 pm

LED ZEPPELIN 50th Anniversary

Daily Express Newspaper [United Kingdom] (25 October, 2018)

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Mojo Magazine [United Kingdom] (December, 2018)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Fri Nov 23, 2018 2:38 am

Planet Rock Magazine [United Kingdom] (December, 2018)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Ubik » Mon Nov 26, 2018 12:01 pm

T, your commitment to this is mind blowing and truly appreciated! I have no idea how you knew there was a single reference to MK in the Daily Express :lol
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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:18 pm

Guitar World Magazine [United States] (January, 2019)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Sat Dec 01, 2018 5:20 pm

Sunday Star Times Newspaper [New Zealand] (2 December, 2018)

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I expected a slurring, drawling knucklehead.

I assumed I'd be getting one-syllable answers, punctuated by grunts and sighs.

Good on guitar, but bad with life, I thought.

I read his autobiography years ago, which led me to believe this man might be a right drongo: a snake-collecting former junkie drunk who gets around in tight leather pants and top hat, his mind addled by decades of heavy intoxicants, loud rock'n'roll and the relentless LA sun.

Slash, it turns out, is something of a charmer. Friendly. Thoughtful. Polite. What can I tell you? The dude is lovely.

"Hey, how you doin'?" he says, sounding implausibly chipper after a long flight.

He's just arrived in Hong Kong, where he has a big show tomorrow with Guns N' Roses. You may have heard of them.

‘‘This tour has spanned two whole years, and now we only have five more gigs. It’s crazy! It all started out with us agreeing to do just one show, then turned into this whole huge thing.’’

Huge, is right. Guns N’ Roses’ monster tour began on April Fool’s Day in 2016, reuniting the fractious core trio – Slash, Axl Rose and Duff McKagan – for the first time since 1993.

It has ground on ever since, with breaks between territories so the members can pursue other projects. Does he have his own dedicated top hat roadie? I forgot to ask.

But we can safely assume Slash is now richer than many small countries – this is the fourthhighest grossing concert tour in history, hauling in US$480 million so far.

And nobody thought it was ever likely to happen, given that many of the principal bandmembers spent years slagging each other off, mainly communicating via lawyers.

There have been other tours with ring-ins, of course, but fans wanted the ‘‘classic line-up’’, and that’s eventually what they got, with former drummer Stephen Adler also guesting on some shows. Rhythm guitarist Izzy Stradlin declined to rejoin because the others ‘‘didn’t want to split the loot equally’’.

Like The Eagles’ infamous ‘‘Hell Freezes Over’’ tour, this Guns N’ Roses marathon has a sly reference to their former antipathy right there in the title: the ‘‘Not In This Lifetime’’ tour.

‘‘What can I tell you, man? It’s been a gas. I was the last person you’d expect to rejoin this band if you’d talked to me a couple of years ago, but it’s been one of the most amazing experiences I ever had. Just so much f…ing fun, you know?’’

But Slash is on the blower to promote two New Zealand shows by his other band, which goes by the cumbersome title of Slash featuring Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators.

Also frontman of Florida hard rock band Alter Bridge, Kennedy has featured on all four of Slash’s solo albums, including this year’s Living The Dream. The other Conspirators – bassist Todd Kerns, drummer Brent Fitz and rhythm guitarist Frank Sidoris – are also seasoned stadium rock veterans and no strangers to our shores.

‘‘I’ve been down to New Zealand twice before with The Conspirators, and we’re always received really well. When we first got together, we all just had instant chemistry, you know?

‘‘It’s a great, straight-ahead rock’n’roll band where everybody plays hard. Technically, Myles has great range and power, but he’s also a very soulful and emotive singer, whether he’s singing our own songs or doing some of my older Guns N’ Roses, Velvet Revolver and Snakepit stuff.’’

Whatever the band, Slash still appears in those ‘‘best guitarists in the history of the universe’’ lists beloved of rock-nerd magazines and websites.

It’s easy to see why. Listen to the dying bars of Paradise City and your jaw drops at the speed, audacity and inspired foolishness of what he is playing. November Rain, Sweet Child O’ Mine, Nightrain and Out Ta Get Me also set high standards.

Slash is a shredding machine, a riff monster extraordinaire. But he hates those ‘‘best player’’ lists. ‘‘I get real uncomfortable when people put me in any sort of ranked line-up, because that’s not what it’s about. The most important thing is that a guitar solo has a sense of melodic purpose and conveys some strong emotion.

‘‘Usually it’s either fight or f…, you know? It’s aggressive or it’s sexy, but the sound of it has gotta make you want to do something.

‘‘A good solo doesn’t have to be fast, it just needs to take you somewhere and, just like the vocal, it should have a distinct voice and its own individual personality.’’

Also, there have always been amazingly fluent and technically gifted guitar players, he says, from Chet Atkins to old blues guys such as Robert Johnson and Muddy Waters.

‘‘I grew up listening to that stuff, and the rock players that followed after. But ever since monster guitarists like Eddie Van Halen came on the scene, there’s been a real focus on new, flashy techniques, and sometimes the music loses its emotional value somewhere along the way. I mean, it’s great to know how to do all that stuff but, for me, the main thing is that the music moves me in some way.’’

Slash says he still gets a tremendous sense of emotional release whenever he plays guitar, which is most of his waking hours.

‘‘Man, I love it. In fact, I probably love playing now more than when I first started. Just now before I picked up the phone, I’ve been sitting in my hotel room, playing the guitar. I dig it so much! Whether I’m about to go on stage or not, I pretty much always have a guitar on my person, and if not, then it’s on my mind.’’

Those keen for an enjoyably lurid romp through this guitar god’s formative years are directed to 2007’s Slash: The Autobiography, co-written with Anthony Bozza.

‘‘When [The Conspirators] first got together, we all just had instant chemistry, you know? It’s a great, straight-ahead rock’n’roll band where everybody plays hard.’’ Slash

Slash comes across as a great deal less articulate than he is today on the phone, but the book offers vivid insights into the junk-heavy LA hard rock scene of the 1980s, and is scattered with splendid quotes such as this one: ‘‘That’s the wonderful thing about leather pants: when you pee yourself in them, they’re more forgiving than jeans.’’

Another revelation is that Slash not only had an ‘‘appetite for destruction’’ but also an aversion to undies.

‘‘I’ve never been the type to wear underwear,’’ he confides. What type, exactly? Hygienic?

Trashed hotel rooms, pliant groupies, drunken benders, and syringes of smack. Meteoric rise followed by explosive blow-out. Bitter enmity between hot-shot guitarist and dictatorial lead singer. Hefty addictions followed by getting clean.

The bio brims with the expected rock star cliches in its later pages, but the early chapters are fascinating.

Now 53, Slash was born Saul Hudson in London to an English Jewish artist father and an African American costume designer mother. He grew up in LA in a bohemian household where Joni Mitchell, Neil Young and Iggy Pop all hung out. His mum once dated David Bowie after his parents split up.

The book follows his apprenticeship in a succession of dodgy LA bands before a fateful meeting with Axl Rose in 1985. Then, well… world domination, really.

After a few years as the biggest band in America, booze, cocaine, heroin and ego clashes took their toll and Guns N’ Roses spectacularly crashed and burned.

But here’s what got me: it turns out the young Saul almost fell into rock’n’roll by accident. What he really wanted to do was ride tiny push-bikes over rough terrain at high speed.

‘‘Oh, yeah, man! Absolutely! I was a pro-BMX racer as a kid, and my main aspiration was to eventually become a moto-cross champion. I was obsessed! But then I inadvertently picked up the guitar and everything switched gears inside of 24 hours, and before long, my career took off.’’

He’s almost sighing as he says this, like it’s a bit of a bummer. Here he is, a multi-millionaire rock star, suddenly wistful for what might have been.

‘‘I still follow the BMX stuff, you know? It’s evolved so much now. I thought we were pretty crazy back in the day, but those riders have taken it to a level I never even dreamed was possible…’’

It’s oddly boyish and sweet, hearing him talk this way. He’s, like – Damn! Who knows what I might have achieved on those wee fast-pedalling trick bikes, if only a gargantuan music career hadn’t got in my way?

And he’s still going. ‘‘I don’t know if I would ever have got as good as those guys, you know? That sport has changed so much, man. I love watching it, but they do some pretty intense stuff these days.’’

Slash has done some pretty intense stuff himself. He’s survived multiple fearsome addictions, for one thing, though they’ve taken their toll.

The years of excess with Guns N’ Roses have left him with a tiny defibrillator implanted in his chest to give his heart an almighty jolt whenever it threatens to lapse back into drug-damaged arrhythmia.

‘‘Oh, yeah. That thing is a testament to the wreckage of my past! Really, I’m fortunate to have survived. I just didn’t care at the time, but it feels like someone’s been lookin’ out for me, because I definitely shouldn’t still be here.

‘‘The fact that I walked away from so many near-death experiences, well… I don’t take any of that for granted. I’m really appreciative that I managed to walk away from all that stuff.’’

The way Slash tells it, he’s had a second chance. He’s been through the fires and come out the other side: a happy, healthy, creative soul, touring with two bands he loves – his solo project with Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators and, of course, his old comrades Guns N’ Roses, the rest of whom are scattered around the same Hong Kong hotel as we speak, resting before the next night’s show.

‘‘I feel blessed, for sure. After these last Guns N’ Roses shows, I’ll be back down in New Zealand with my own band, and it’s always really good to get back together with those guys.

‘‘I just love the fact that I’ve got my own band as well as that other huge one, and it’s all going on at the same time. It’s amazing, man, and pretty unexpected. I’ve been in other band set-ups over the years as well as solo, but the Guns thing has just been, like… Wow! What can I tell you, man? It’s been a trip!’’

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Wed Dec 05, 2018 9:23 pm

Metal Hammer Magazine [United Kingdom] (January, 2019)

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Re: Alter Bridge - Magazine Covers

Postby Torsten » Sun Dec 09, 2018 5:41 pm

The National - News - Weekend Newspaper [United Arab Emirates] (7 December, 2018)

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Guns N' Roses' Slash on why he has the best job in the world: 'I just love what I do'

Slash is not hard to miss. Not because of his fondness for flamboyant headgear and penchant for wearing aviator sunglasses, but because he is simply the coolest dude in the room.

This becomes apparent when I meet the 53-year-old rocker in a hotel suite, a day before he strapped on his guitar for the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix After-race Concert to a capacity crowd of 40,000 with Guns N’ Roses. He is kitted out in the rock uniform of black shirt and jeans. The signature top hat has been replaced by a baseball cap which does just enough to contain his flowing curls. His shades successfully hide the weariness of his two-year touring schedule. The creases on his face tell the tale of a body on the mend after being pushed to its limit.

Funnily enough, as we sit down to chat it appears there is one thing that needs to be taken care of before we get down to business.

“Where is the coffee?” Slash asks pointedly. When it arrives his first sip indicates that our chat can now begin. With that, his manager and Polynesian bodyguard Kimo quietly leave the room – a rarity for a star of this magnitude. As Slash explains it, whether it is working with mercurial musicians such as Guns N’ Roses frontman Axl Rose and the late Michael Jackson or chatting with journalists like me, the rocker prefers everyone to be comfortable. “I don’t take myself all that seriously … if anybody I start to work with has a preconceived notion or some sort of idea in their mind about where I’m coming from because of what they read about me, I just sort of break all that down,” he says.

“It’s not what I would call a conscious effort, but I definitely don’t want to make an error in that I’m anything bigger than the other person I’m with. You know what I mean?”

'I just love what I do'

Absolutely, but the man is still Slash and I wasn’t about to invite him for a card game on his day off, so it’s ultra professional all the way. Slash is a workaholic, which is just as well because despite making his way to the rock summit when it comes to record sales – he’s sold more than 100 million albums with Guns N’ Roses alone – and his rock legend status undisputed, he still has a lot to say but there is a stipulation that the questions for our interview focus on his solo career. You can’t blame him because amid the band’s present ­record-breaking stadium tour, Slash released the riff-tastic album, Living the Dream, with Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators.

Led by the swaggering single Driving Rain, the September release had Slash once again teaming up with vocalist Kennedy (of Alter Bridge fame) for another, seductive dose of dark and driving rock ’n’ roll.

Although Slash admits the album’s title is more a sardonic reflection on the world today, it is worth asking if, three decades on, he feels his career has plateaued from a dream come true to what is now just a lucrative job?

“I am one of the rare people you’ll meet that’s been doing this for as long as I have that loves it as wholeheartedly and as deeply as I did when I first picked up the guitar,” he says. “I just love what I do, and I continue to do it to the hilt, because I love being on the road. I love being in the studio. I love playing every night.”

That work ethic, he says, has held him in good stead throughout his career. After acrimoniously quitting Guns N’ Roses back in 1996 – only to return to the fold two decades later – Slash didn’t succumb to any creative block. He simply got on with it and formed a new band, Slash’s Snakepit, before finding chart success with Velvet Revolver. The disillusion of the latter group, partly due to singer Scott Weiland’s spiralling substance abuse that eventually took his life, led Slash to waste no time in setting up his next project with Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators.

“I’m sort of a busybody,” he says. “I’m a little bit of a workaholic where I love to be busy, ­absorbed in whatever it is that I’m doing, and I get into a lot of different stuff.”

Yet, despite the various projects and singers enlisted to deliver his songwriting talents, Slash says the creative process hasn’t changed over the years.

He has worked with an eclectic array of vocal talents. From Axl’s howling style for Guns N’ Roses and Weiland’s elastic voice for Velvet Revolver, to Kennedy’s soaring takes with The Conspirators, Slash says he doesn’t write with a particular voice in mind. Instead, he focuses on recording riffs while on the road before fleshing them out with his various bands upon his return.

When it comes to Kennedy, it is the singer’s melodic nous that gets Slash excited. “He ­always comes up with something that’s uniquely different to what I might have imagined for a particular part,” he says. “So, I don’t even bother doing that any more. I just let him run with it.”

Indeed, Kennedy’s expansive vocals – equally at home on the ferocious rocker The Call of the Wild to the gothic blues of Lost Inside the Girl – allow the album to be one of Slash’s most dynamic offerings yet.

Rock music is in a healthy place

More important to Slash than its strong sales – the album topped the United States rock charts upon its release – is that it was created solely for the love of the craft.

With rock ’n’ roll not being part of the musical mainstream any more, Slash says it has allowed him and a new generation of bands to focus on creating music without the disruption of fame and subsequent excesses. Slash knows all about the latter. A once chronic drinker and substance abuser, he has been sober since 2005 after surviving a harrowing battle with congestive heart failure, which resulted in him having a defibrillator fitted.

“I think rock ’n’ roll has become a place that is really healthy. Young artists that are coming out now have to get rid of the whole myth of the rock star thing – the money, and the limousines. All that used to be a huge lure to kids,” he says.

“And it’s not like that now. It’s like you really have to be super-passionate. You have to work really hard for it, and you have to build up an audience, and even then you don’t know if you’re ever going to be able to get a record deal, because it’s just the way the business is now.”

Although Slash joined a rock band in an era when record sales mattered and labels had lavish budgets to fund recording sessions, you get the sense that this was a merely a fortunate coincidence.

Born Saul Hudson, Slash was brought into the world in north London to an African-American mother, Ola, a costume designer for the likes of David Bowie and Joni Mitchell, and English artist father Anthony Hudson. His dad designed album art for records by Crosby, Stills & Nash and Neil Young. Slash grew up in a creatively fertile atmosphere but was hampered by his parents’ divorce when he was 9 years old. He was in his fourth year of living in Los Angeles at the time, and it was this period that saw Slash bandied around from his mother to his grandmother’s house if his mother was working.

A “reserved child”, Slash says he handled the instability by riding his bike and eventually learning to play the guitar. “When you put on a guitar, that is the biggest form of expression for me. So, without that, I’m not much of a thrill, or an outspoken type of individual. But with a guitar, I can say a lot of stuff,” he says. “I’m still not real good with the interface kind of thing.”

That shy streak is there for all to see during Slash’s live performances. He often stands right of stage, with his face shrouded in a top hat and sunglasses – something he describes as a psychological curtain drawn between him and the crowd.

“I’m definitely in my own space. When I’m playing, that’s when I feel probably the most comfortable and probably the most myself,” he says. “While there is the energy that you’re feeding off of the audience, I do have a real problem actually looking into the audience. So I do find myself playing in a kind of private little world.”

It is for this reason that Slash will probably never retire. With the guitar being his preferred mode of communication, coupled with good health and his aversion to small talk, we can expect those riffs to keep coming for a while yet. I ask him if there is anything more he can actually say after a celebrated career that has had him conjure all sorts of memorable sounds from six strings.

“The guitar is the kind of thing that’s just a never-ending journey,” he says. “It’s definitely something that knows no boundaries. It’s only limited by the user’s limitations. You know what I’m saying? There are endless possibilities on it. So, it’ll always be a source of fascination for me.”


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