Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby mitch103 » Wed May 23, 2018 3:16 pm

Suit yourself! I have literally no self control when it comes to new ab/tremonti

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Marshall » Thu May 24, 2018 5:39 am

Radio Metal - A Dying Machine Review [French - translated]

"Mark Tremonti is doing well, thanks for him. Whether with Alter Bridge or his solo project that has rewarded us with the effective doublet Cauterize (2015) and Dust (2016), the guitar hero does not intend to give up and continues to share his enthusiasm. This go, it is transparent when one is interested in his new venture, a twin concept album of a novel co-written with cyber punk author John Shirley: A Dying Machine. A fervent lover of literature, the idea of a "dying machine" seemed to Mark Tremonti an opportunity to try to create a story and a universe to which his music would be subordinated. A Dying Machine, the guitarist's fourth solo opus, is an experience that must be accompanied by the text, or at least contemplated with it.

The idea was born in Hungary during a tour with Alter Bridge, while the guitarist warmed up before going on stage. It is that of a future coexistence between humans and vessels (literally "vessels" or "receptacles" in French). Without going to dystopia, Mark Tremonti tried to anticipate, illustrating in his own way the ambivalent relationship between the human and the machine and precisely the nature of what makes humanity. Conscious of not having the time or the ability to write a novel alone, the text of A Dying Machine was mainly worked by John Shirley. Scheduled to go out at the same time as the album, the two items are almost inseparable. Musically, the music should serve the subject, Tremonti composes for the book. Often based on drum rhythms, which could be likened to the "beat of the heart" of the machine - like the peaches starting the album before embarking on the breathtaking rhythm of "Bringer Of War" - the guitarist seeks to develop his songs to portray the protagonist's moods. Thus, "The Day When Legions Burned" with the accents of speed metal draws the violence and tells the beginning of the conflict between the vessels and the humans. The set of compositions is a window on the feelings of the characters in the novel submitted to the paradox of humans who "machinisent" with synthetic organs and vessels that seek their share of humanity and its recognition. The use of both fiction and the exploration of human feelings allows Tremonti to indulge in titles closer to the ballad than usual, like "Desolation" (with probably the best guitar lead of the album) and especially "The First The Last". Garrett Whitlock's pulsating drum set supported by Eric Friedman's bass pop brings out the composition among the thirteen others and unveils a skin-deep Tremonti in his vocal performance (evidenced by the many "wohooo" a tad caricatures of outro).

The work done on the song is in line with what Tremonti has done on his two previous opus, the accessibility of the music of the latter owes much to the melodic quality of the refrains, whether it is the languorous "As The Silence Becomes Me "or the dynamic" Trust "which alternates the tensions between the verses supported by a syncopated rhythm guitar and the chorus with open chords. Indeed, A Dying Machine does not reinvent Mark Tremonti's style. The innovations are minimal, they reside in shades of tunings and at the level of singing ("The First The Last", the quasi pop-punk "Take You With Me"). If Tremonti allows melodic arrangements and clear passages more explicit, it does not deny so his powerful and aggressive leaning which remains the key tone of the album: the three opening titles, including peach «The Bringer Of War And his martial snare drum, lay the foundations of the opus. We can see the remains of Cauterize and Dust, but with an increased focus on songwriting, album concept requires. Tremonti is not very much carried away by guitar demonstrations. We find solos during the very power-thrashy "From The Sky", the explosive "Throw Them To The Lions" and the heavy "Make It Hurt" or the mid-tempo grungy "Traipse". The guitarist is more interested in nuancing atmospheres, the result of a composition process parallel to the writing. Witness "A Dying Machine", passing from melancholy to a form of rage, and its finely developed ethereal bridge, or the introduction to the "Trust" Deftones. There is however a desire to get out of his comfort zone, detectable via the instrumental conclusion "Found" which reflects the love of the guitarist for Massive Attack through an incongruous but welcome trip-hop approach.

If one ignores reading the novel in parallel listening, A Dying Machine is almost "Dust bis" with a songwriting more nuanced and fignole. However, when one becomes aware of the work done in the creation of a fiction and its "soundtrack" that is A Dying Machine, it proves that it is appreciated at different scales, whether it is during a total immersion by pairing it with reading or in a looser way relying on the talent of Mark Tremonti."


http://www.radiometal.com/article/tremonti-a-dying-machine,300449

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Thu May 24, 2018 7:30 pm

I cut off a bit of the interview at the end when some questions not related to the album were asked but you can click the link and check them out if you wish!

Radio Metal Interview: http://www.radiometal.com/article/mark- ... ier,300263

MARK TREMONTI, THE NOVELIST

There is Mark Tremonti the fan of heavy / speed metal, and Mark Tremonti the guitarist who makes us more and more enjoy this passion through big riffs in his solo project Tremonti, but also his main group Alter Bridge, and then there is Mark Tremonti the literary devouring fantasy and science fiction novels. A facet of the character we know a little less but we will get to know through his new record: A Dying Machine .

Indeed, if in the form the fourth album of Tremonti continues in the tradition of its predecessors, in the background it is an ambitious concept where the music is accompanied by a novel written in collaboration with the author cyber punk John Shirley, and that could even be brought to the screen ... This results in a different approach to the creative process, more thoughtful, less spontaneous, but no less effective in rendering. We discuss all this with the principal concerned.

Radio Metal: A Dying Machine is a conceptual album with a novel. This is the first time you do something like this. What is the origin of this idea?

Mark Tremonti : I was on tour last year in Hungary. I was in my dressing room, I warmed up for the concert and I started writing this idea and "A Dying Machine" came out. It materialized in this story which I had the idea just before going on stage. So while I was on stage, I was trying to remember what I was thinking about. I was excited by that, I was thoroughly in this idea, I loved the parties that came to me. I could not wait to flesh it out and finish it! And as soon as the concert was over, I continued to write and write about this idea in the concept. When I wrote the following song for the album, I tried to tie a concept in this plot, this scenario, and it went on from there. It took me about a week to finish drawing the outline of the first song, and then it took me longer to finish the final lyrics, but once it was done I was excited to use this as a basis for the rest of the storyline. Never in my career I would have imagined that I would make a conceptual album but then it happened naturally.

Do you think these moments just before a concert have a special atmosphere that is good for creativity?

Yeah, I think so. We are excited to go on stage, we have adrenaline rises and then we have this extra energy. We think a little in terms of live, how it will be felt during the concert, so when you write something, there is energy in it.

The plot of the concept takes place at the turn of the century when humans and synthetic beings called "vessels" try to coexist. What were the sources of inspiration for this concept?

I happened to be reading Stephen King's The Dark Tower series. My brother Mike kept telling me over the years: "You have to read that! And when the movie came out, I thought, "You know what? Before watching the movie, I'm going to read the book. Since I started writing this novel, I'm still on this damn last book in the series, so I'm not finished yet, but when I was in the third book in the series, there was this scene where a machine built thousands of years ago began to perish, bugging, aging and corroding. Subliminally in my mind, I had this concept that took shape, I saw it as a great concept about a machine dying, because typically, we do not think of a machine in these terms. It fell to me from heaven, "you're a dying machine." It has, so to speak, planted the seed to develop history.

What are the main ideas and messages you wanted to convey through this story?

I did not want it to be a typical sci-fi thing. I wanted it to be more centered on the human side of what would happen if you were a human being with a synthetic brain, and you were programmed to be as human as possible, but you are abandoned because you are a machine and you is considered to be less than a human and not having emotion, and no one has empathy for you, the sadness of those things that are almost seen as machines when they have real emotions, that they feel despair and anguish, and all that. Some scenes are centered on some of those beings who are despised, and the sadness and despair they go through.

Is it purely fictional or are there anchorages in our reality and perhaps our future?

There are certainly anchors in reality. I teamed up with a writer named John Shirley. He specializes in futurism and the knowledge of what will happen, and he spoke to TEDx in Belgium about technology and the direction it takes. So when I talked about the story, he said, "Well, it's actually a technology being developed by this company, it will happen in so many years, and this and that. So he helped me make the story more legitimate and real. The explanations of the book and the scenario are made on a more scientific basis so that it is credible.

Could this story be a comment about men who are abandoning their humanity more and more?

In the story, I brought it like, say, someone who has a bad heart. In the future there will be a synthetic heart. It will not be necessary to wait for a heart transplant, for which you have to have the right blood group and wait for the right opportunity, that an organ donor dies in a car accident so that you can take his organ so to save your life. It will not be necessary to wait for a liver transplant, there will be at some point a synthetic liver. There will be replacement hips, there will be replacement knees, etc. So in history, at the turn of the century, they will make the first synthetic brain that can be programmed so that it contains all the information when that thing wakes up, as if they had lived a lifetime of knowledge. So at that time, humanity becomes more like a machine, and I think we will become more and more machines in the future. But the vessels are the opposite; they are machines that want to be more and more human.

About the song "The First And The Last", you said that the band "gets away with writing a song loaded with emotion, because it's a fictional landscape. Is it hard for you to open up to a more direct and personal level? Do you need metaphors or fiction to go on a more emotional ground?

Yeah, you know, there's a side in my way of making songs that is more in this vein, the more emotional side, more ballad, that if you went out in a hard rock or metal band, some people would might not like it, but you know, lots of bands have done it over the years, lots of heavy metal bands do ballads. But at the text level, it looks like a love story that goes wrong. When you can hide behind a fictional character, it's easier to sing an emotional song like that, without it being a love song that concerns you and relates to your life. Because I have never written a love song during my career, and that's the closest I have ever been to making one. But if, I open all the time as a composer, I have all kinds of emotional things, and I also have a lot of heavy stuff. But when you make a group more based on metal, these other ideas tend to be overshadowed because it does not stick. So it's nice to be able to slip some of them in this way.

The song "Take You With Me" is about someone trying to pick up someone else. Who was this person for you in your life?

My God ! My whole family, mainly. My dad just spent the last few months with me and every time I'm here working at the studio, he sits down and interrupts me all the time, tells me how much he appreciates what I do, how much he is proud of me. My brothers are very supportive and they are the first people to hear these songs. My wife and children ... people who matter!

What were the moments in your life when you needed someone to do this for you?

I think the hardest time in my life was probably when ... I wrote a song called "Shed My Skin" with Alter Bridge that probably speaks about the hardest moment of my life, when I was younger and I moved, I no longer had my brothers, I no longer had my friends, I no longer had my group, I was more or less alone for the first time in my life, he seems like I was fifteen. It was really a trying time in my life, but it made me a songwriter. I spent a lot of time alone writing these meaningful songs, those desperate songs, those emotional songs. I think it pushed me to open new emotional doors, to be a deeper composer than I was.

The goal is for the novel to be available at the same time as the album is released. As you said, you write it with John Shirley. How did you collaborate on this project? What were your respective roles in the making of this novel?

So I imagined this album and the story that goes with it, and then I thought I was going to write the book myself but I soon realized that there was no way I could have the time to do it. And I always had this dream of publishing a book, and I bought lots of "how to write a damn good novel," and Stephen King's book on writing, and such a person's book, all those books about writing, and I thought, "I like reading so much, why can not I take advantage of my imagination and look for some references to see if I could try to write something? But I would not have had enough time. So I contacted my agent at UTA, and he has a literary agency, I spoke with them on the phone, I told them the story, they liked it a lot, they sent me a handful of names writers I reviewed but I did not feel like they were on the same wavelength as them. So they sent me another batch, and yet another, and I finally came across the stuff of John Shirley. I really thought it fit perfectly. He was focused on Futurism, a scientific approach to things, and he's also an author who has won a Bram Stocker Award. He was one of the original authors of cyber punk. So I decided, let's go on John Shirley. "

Then I started talking to John, I explained to him again and again the script, the characters, how it evolves, this and that. He was coming back to me, we had things that were not in sync, so I said, "Why do not we draw the outline of the story and then we'll start?" It has become a twenty-nine page summary of the story, which we have finally approved; "This is happening here, it's happening there, etc. And then he begins to write the first chapter, he gives it to me, I read it, make changes ... If I have an idea, it is very good to quickly expand it, it does it brilliantly. When I saw for the first time how he wrote, I was there: "Thank God, I decided to associate with him! Because I could never have written so well. It would have taken me ... He wrote since the 70s, it seems to me, so it would have taken much more than time to read a few books on how to write, and read a pack of books, to be a writer as good as him. So I'm happy he's my partner.

With this project, you seem to put literature and music at the same level. Have these two artistic disciplines been equally inspiring for you?

Absolutely! I'm just as excited about the novel as about the album. I love every minute of working on it. I reread the book all the time, I walk through it and make notes, and I do everything I can to help John with anything I see, any change that's needed. He even told me, "You know, you're doing a lot of work trying to reread, reread and reread ..." I'm here: "I appreciate every second! Because I do not know how many times in my life I would be able to do it again. It's something new for me, so exciting. It's been a decade since I wanted to do that, write a story. This is the perfect opportunity to write even more than a story, it's almost like writing the soundtrack of a book, so you can do more 3D experience for people to get into the album and the novel.

We know your background as a musician, but what was your relationship to literature?

When I was in high school, I hated reading, I hated English classes, I really did not like it. I was more of a math student, in terms of my strengths at school. And then, years later, I fell in love with reading! Initially, I just wanted to read the old books that everyone reads, Heart Catcher, Fahrenheit 451, Moby Dick and all that stuff. But then, my brother Mike was a big fan of sci-fi and fantastic. For Christmas, he bought me books from George RR Martin. I said, "I do not want to read fantasy and sci-fi, I want to read classics. And finally, I had no more books to read, so I read Game Of Thrones, which is one of the first books I read that really made me, but then really, made me love reading. I'm so glad they did a series, because it's amazing to see the show after reading the books so many years ago. After that, I devoured everything I could get, especially ... Among my favorite things is sci-fi and fantasy. Now my favorite authors, apart from George RR Martin, are Joe Haldman, John Scalzi, Mark Lawrence, Patrick Rothfuss ... There are so many! So being able to do this book in this vein is great!

Do you see parallels between literature and rock / metal music?

I think people who like heavy metal songs a bit moody and atmospheric would be in the right frame of mind to enjoy that same kind of feeling in a book. Music and literature, both, take you on a journey in your head. I think it's better than ... It's great to watch a movie and other but I find that when you read a book or listen to an album, your imagination creates all these images in your head of which you are yourself the director . You can see all these characters materialize in your head and take you on a journey. Ten people could read the same book and each would go on a different journey. It's the same for music: people see and hear differently. Some are diehard fans, some like it, some do not like it ... Music and literature inspire people differently and allow them to use their imagination.

Would you say that writers are as much rock stars as rock musicians?

I am a huge fan of these authors. When I have the opportunity to talk to one of them on the internet or something, I'm just as excited as talking to one of my heroes in the world of music. I do not think they see themselves as rock stars. I think they find it strange that a person in a rock band is a big fan of sci-fi writers, but it's amazing what these people have created.

I imagine you do not approach a conceptual album in the same way or, as you said, the soundtrack of a novel in the same way as a normal album. So, what was the process of creating such an album?

The album was written without knowing that it would become a novel. I wanted him to follow the script from one end of the album to the other. So after I wrote the song "A Dying Machine", I just programmed a drum loop ... At the beginning, it was just "let's make these songs have a different feeling. "A Dying Machine" was at a certain tempo, so I said, "Let's do a speed metal song. So I set up a drum loop of about two hundred beats per minute, I wrote the song "The Day When Legions Burned". So I first wrote the riffs, then I composed the chorus and others, and then I had to write the story corresponding to the song. This song was about a reminder of those beings we talk about in history. They are recalled because some of them begin to disobey, to melt them. It's a little what triggers this war between the vessels and humanity. From there, I wrote the following song, which is "Bringer Of War", and they all pretty well stick with each other. They helped me tell the story. I did not know where I was going with the story before I started writing the lyrics by accident, and I fleshed it out from there.

So you mean that the music has roughly guided you in the story ...

It was like doing the impossible. As I said, I put a drum loop, I played over and saw what came out of it, if I found a melody, if I found a riff, and then I saw what was the atmosphere of the song . If it was an aggressive heavy song, it would probably be under the protagonist's point of view, the more evil and aggressive character in the story would tell his story through this song, but if it was a song more emotional, it would be more from the point of view of the character of "A Dying Machine", the woman. I think there are three or four songs from his perspective, there are probably three or four songs from the perspective of the other main character, and then there are some other characters in the story, as in the song "As The Silence Becomes Me" which is under the perspective of another character, it is seen or heard only once in the book. Once I had all these songs made, it was fun to be able to explain them to John and help me materialize them in the story and explain their personalities. It's damn exciting when a chapter is sitting and I can examine it. It's almost like hearing a mix for the first time!

What were your references in terms of conceptual album?


I only know a few that I own, and they are King Diamond albums. I have never been inspired to make a conceptual album. It just happened alone. I mean I'm a huge fan of King Diamond and Mercyful Fate but I've never been a fan of the concept album format. It did not bother me, I thought it was great, I love those of King Diamond, but I never thought "that's what I want to do, I want to make a conceptual album", before it happens alone.

Have you not yet tried to analyze some of these concepts to inspire you on how to do yours?

No. When it comes to creating things, I try to keep as far away as possible from any kind of outside influence.

According to the press release, you approached the sessions "more prepared than you've ever been in the past. Do you think that your past albums have sometimes suffered from a lack of preparation?

No, I think it's just another way of approaching things. This album needed to be more worked because it's a conceptual album, it's not something that's done like that in pre-production. With Alter Bridge, I can work with Myles [Kennedy], I write all the best ideas I find, and then we get together and assemble ideas. And after, the themes of these songs arrive at the last minute, it is a little in the moment, which gives them a certain excitement, a different feeling. But that's different. It was built well before going to the studio. I think there are advantages and disadvantages to both. I believe that when you work too much on things, you can lose some of that initial excitement and end up changing things that should not be. When you write something in the moment, you keep that indescribable energy. There's something about this excitement when you create in the moment that's great too.

There is a song in the album that obviously sounds very different from everything you've done in the past, it's the instrumental "Found" that sounds very trip-hop and that closes the album. How did you come to make such a song?

We had already finished composing the album and doing the pre-production. The batteries were recorded. I was working on the finalization of my guitar and other parts. Eric [Freeman] came and said, "Play me those songs. Because he was going to record the bass for one of them the next day, so he wanted to run it with me before I went there. While he was taking his bass, I started to rummage with the guitar and found the guitar line of "Found", and then he came and said, "Wow, that's great! He grabbed his bass and started playing with me. We really loved the feeling of this part and I said, "I do not want to wait for the next Tremonti album to release that! I want to take it out now. Let's make it a little hidden track that comes after the last track of the album. Maybe the album will end and forty seconds later, this hidden track will arrive, we can program it. "I'm a big fan of Massive Attack, our engineer Jef [Mol] worked with Nine Inch Nails and he's very good in this area, with programming, this more industrial side, this sound a bit like the Massive Attack. So it was perfect for us to go and record the guitar and the bass for that. We sat all day programming the rhythm part and then Elvis [Michael Baskette] came afterwards and programmed some extra stuff over it. We made it our first instrumental and it's so different and so much more in the vein of a soundtrack than the rest of the album, I find. I'm glad we did it. I think it's the perfect song to close the album. I think it will take people by surprise and it will be different from what they expect.

Do you think you could go further in this experimental and electronic side? Do you think this could be the beginning of a new musical exploration for Tremonti in the future?

I had the idea to make the last track fade out and be the beginning of the next album, which I would develop to make a complete song, but yeah, I'd love to make a full album of this kind of thing, maybe without vocals, just programmed ambient music. As I said, I'm a big fan of Massive Attack, so I think doing something in this vein would be a really fun project.

Overall, musically, this album is not bad in the tradition of your previous albums with Tremonti, apart from the track "Found". Nevertheless, do you have the feeling of having evolved musically with A Dying Machine? Are there new experiments that may be less obvious?

There are different tunings and others on the guitar to open new doors in terms of nuances of chords. At the arrangement level, we tried to mix things up a bit. I tried to experiment more with my vocal style. And making a concept was a big difference from what I did in the past. I always try to do something that keeps me on the alert rather than constantly regurgitating the same thing.

Could we expect you to go further in this conceptual idea, like going into the field of cinema?

I would love ! I was in high school with a famous director and he loved the story, I traveled with him a few times and he will stall a meeting I hope with ... I will not mention these directors now, but I cross fingers. If they love history, it would be the biggest dream come true, having a conceptual album with a novel and a movie. I could die happy!
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Thu May 24, 2018 7:52 pm

One thing I have questions about after reading the interview, is the correct arrangement of the tracklisting to make the most sense chronologically and based on the narrative...

Because according to how Mark describes it in this interview, I interpreted that The Day When Legions Burned comes before Bringer of War chronologically yet is Track 10 of the album while Bringer is first? :headscratch :shrug
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby nagpo » Fri May 25, 2018 11:21 am

When is the book coming out? Is it up for preorder yet?

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Ubik » Fri May 25, 2018 1:49 pm

Hoping he's seen Blade Runner at this point.
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Fri May 25, 2018 2:41 pm

Ubik wrote:Hoping he's seen Blade Runner at this point.

Wouldn't it be better if he hasnt seen it if you think about it? :headscratch
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Fri May 25, 2018 2:48 pm

nagpo wrote:When is the book coming out? Is it up for preorder yet?

No. Hes still getting the book finished in terms of writing. Then once they've finally finished writing the book, it will take like 2 or more months to get it revised for grammar and all that stuff, then it will be printed and made into books so Its most likely coming out in August or September.
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby gbruin » Sat May 26, 2018 3:35 am

Ubik wrote:Hoping he's seen Blade Runner at this point.

I keep getting that sort of vibe, too. I'm sure Mark's narrative is unique, but the theme sounds a bit in that vein. It also brings up Ex Machina and Her a bit, too.

I really can't wait for this book! Avoiding these songs so far is not fun. I am barely master of my own domain here.
Last edited by gbruin on Sat May 26, 2018 3:37 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby gbruin » Sat May 26, 2018 3:37 am

So excited, in fact, that I'm double posting.
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby facelessman07 » Sat May 26, 2018 4:46 am

gbruin wrote:master of my own domain


Saw this phrase and instantly thought it'd make a sick song title for the album.

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Mr. Slash » Sat May 26, 2018 5:52 am

facelessman07 wrote:
gbruin wrote:master of my own domain


Saw this phrase and instantly thought it'd make a sick song title for the album.

Reminds me more of a phrase that the admins of this forum would use regularly. Get it? Domain!

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby WaywardOne » Sat May 26, 2018 11:31 am

facelessman07 wrote:
gbruin wrote:master of my own domain


Saw this phrase and instantly thought it'd make a sick song title for the album.


I would only accept that if the album cover was a mundane picture of George Kastanza

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Ubik » Sat May 26, 2018 2:11 pm

gbruin wrote:I keep getting that sort of vibe, too. I'm sure Mark's narrative is unique, but the theme sounds a bit in that vein. It also brings up Ex Machina and Her a bit, too.

I really can't wait for this book! Avoiding these songs so far is not fun. I am barely master of my own domain here.

All three of those are aggressively good films so if we can still compare after the release, the boy's done great!

Though we can already say that anyway to be fair just for the album, I've been really impressed with his lyrics so far.
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Sat May 26, 2018 4:37 pm

https://overdrive-mag.com/2018/05/26/re ... g-machine/

Best known as the guitarist of the rock band Creed and progressive-metal band Alter Bridge, Mark Tremonti returns with his founded and fronted alternative-metal band Tremonti. The Orlando, Florida based band first debuted in 2012, signed to FRET 12 Records releasing ‘All I Was’ on July 17, 2012 and reaching the number five spot on Billboard’s Top Hard Rock Albums. Tremonti’s follow up ‘Cauterize’, released June 8, 2015 at the same time recorded their third album ‘Dirt’, which was later released April 29, 2016. Now with Napalm Records, Tremonti is set to release ‘A Dying Machine’ in 2018.

‘A Dying Machine’ contains 14 power driven tracks varying in intensity with tracks like album opener Bringer Of War, title track A Dying Machine and closer Found. Each track gets stronger and stronger as the album progresses, the intensity drives the album beginning to end. Typical in fashion, Tremonti delivers with their new release. Their new 2018 release is Tremonti’s fourth full-length studio release as well as their first release since signing with Napalm Records, the album was produced by well-known producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette. The 2018 release showcases Mark’s unique songwriting and his signature vocal style, backed by punishing riffs and fiery solos heard throughout.

Make It Hurt opens with a muffled sound that quickly breaks into full-blown sound as thundering drummed beats keep the pace going. Mark’s clear and commanding vocals deliver a thrilling account accompanied by electrifying guitar riffs leading into a harmonic echoing power solo. As Make It Hurt intensifies, Mark breaks into a second ear piercing solo bringing the familiar in-your-face Tremonti sound.

The Day When Legions Burn keeps the progressive metal aggressiveness going with the track’s opening of thunderous drummed beats joined by hastened crunching guitar riffs. Pulsating drums follow alongside powerful guitars and dynamic vocals. Mark’s non-stop emphatic vocals vary from strident to melodic throughout as he begins his signature earsplitting solo. The Day When Legions Burn once again showcases the profound talent Tremonti possesses and delivers to the album.

‘A Dying Machine’ is solid album through and through embodying everything Tremonti has achieved since his time in Creed, as well as his time with current label mate Myles Kennedy in Alter Bridge. Vocal and musical talents go into overdrive as the album progresses, the detail and clarity flows from song to song, giving the listener the opportunity to take in each word and bring them into another state of mind. The heaviness of tracks like From The Sky and Throw Them To The Lions balance alongside catchy singles like Take You With Me and The First The Last. Tremonti will set off in June in support of their new album, they also will be opening for Iron Maiden throughout Europe in July. The band has also confirmed spots at Carolina Rebellion, Lunatic Luau, Graspop Metal Meeting, Hellfest and Wacken Open Air. ‘A Dying Machine’ releases on Napalm Records everywhere on June 8, 2018.
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WaywardOne
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby WaywardOne » Sat May 26, 2018 9:59 pm

SHEAKENBAKEN wrote:https://overdrive-mag.com/2018/05/26/review-tremonti-dying-machine/

Tremonti’s follow up ‘Cauterize’, released June 8, 2015 at the same time recorded their third album ‘Dirt’, which was later released April 29, 2016.


Does Alice In Chains know about this yet? :facepalm

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Marshall
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Marshall » Sun May 27, 2018 7:16 am

We are going to do a review if everything goes well. If you have any questions or directions we should go - let me know!

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Sun May 27, 2018 9:09 am

Marshall wrote:We are going to do a review if everything goes well. If you have any questions or directions we should go - let me know!


If you are given the opportunity to review the album, what are the limitations to what you can say? I wouldn't mind just a brief description of each individual song for all 14 songs. but I don't know if there's a limit to how many you can discuss in a review :shrug
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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby Marshall » Sun May 27, 2018 11:38 am

For „The Last Hero“ we did a track-by-track review.
We plan the same for ADM.

https://www.60minuten.net/alter-bridge-the-last-hero/

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Re: Tremonti pt #4 - A Dying Machine

Postby SHEAKENBAKEN » Sun May 27, 2018 12:09 pm

Marshall wrote:For „The Last Hero“ we did a track-by-track review.
We plan the same for ADM.

https://www.60minuten.net/alter-bridge-the-last-hero/

Looking forward to it then if all goes well and you get the opportunity! :peace
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